Light Industry
Light Industry
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Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Film Projection (But Were Afraid to Ask)
Tuesday, November 5, 2019 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn

This evening at Light Industry, following a presentation of Morgan Fisher’s Projection Instructions (1976), Spencer Christiano will provide an overview of the work that goes into film projection, a practice which is essential to the exhibition of motion pictures yet largely invisible. His talk coincides with the release of The Art of Film Projection: A Beginner’s Guide, a handsome volume published by the @eastmanmuseum in Rochester, where Christiano serves as Chief Projectionist. The book surveys the role’s myriad dimensions, including chapters on the film print (perforations, projection speed, aspect ratio, reel length), the projector (the projector mechanism, the picture head, the sound reader, the projector’s motor), screening environments (the booth, the screen, speakers), film inspection (the rewind bench, splices, shrinkage), pre-show preparations (threading the projector, mounting the reels, framing), final touches (gate tension, focus, masking), and of course the show itself, as well as information on the maintenance of the apparatus. There’s even a section dedicated to screening that most beautiful, rare, and—because of its extreme flammability—dangerous of film stocks: nitrate.

Beyond detailing the technical aspects of projection, the guide also advances an argument for the projectionist’s curatorial function. The care which should be put into the task is one of the most vital stages of film preservation; exhibited under the proper conditions, a print can survive unblemished after decades of screenings. Since the production of new prints is becoming more difficult with each passing year due to rising lab costs, the discontinuation of film stocks, and the challenges of obtaining quality negatives, the future of seeing films in their original format depends, in no small part, on the person who changes the reels, the star of our program.

Tickets - Pay-what-you-wish, available at door.

Please note: seating is limited. First-come, first-served. Box office opens at 6:30pm.
Tony Conrad: Movie Show
Saturday, November 9 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn
Presented with @primaryinfo
Introduced by Constance DeJong and @lamphole

Straight and Narrow, Beverly and Tony Conrad, 1970
Film Feedback, Tony Conrad, 1974
Lecture and Screening with Tony Conrad at Carnegie Museum of Art for Independent Film Makers Series, 1974 (excerpt)
Cycles of 3s and 7s, Tony Conrad, 1977
Movie Show, Tony Conrad, 1977
Accordion, Tony Conrad, 1981
In Line, Tony Conrad, 1985

Newly published by Primary Information, Writings is the first collection to widely survey Tony Conrad’s prolific activity as a writer. Edited by artists Constance DeJong and Andrew Lampert, the book spans the years 1961–2012 and includes fifty-seven pieces: essays originally published in small press magazines, exhibition catalogs, anthologies, and album liner notes, along with other previously unpublished texts. He devotes critical essays both to grand subjects—horology, neurolinguistics, and the historical development of Western music—and more quotidian topics, such as television advertising and camouflage. He also writes on media activism, network communications, censorship, and the political and cultural implications of corporate and global media. Its release has occasioned our show this evening.

Conrad’s writings on cinema form a substantial portion of the anthology, with entries concerning particular works of his like The Flicker, Loose Connection, Articulation of Boolean Algebra for Film Opticals, and the “Yellow Movies,” as well as numerous theoretical forays into the nature of moving image art. Our program surveys Conrad’s film and video output over several decades, marking his shift between these two technologies with a rare screening of Film Feedback, Conrad’s remarkable attempt to create the structures and effects of electronic feedback using celluloid. The screening also includes his final experiment in the flicker film, Straight and Narrow, made with his then-wife Beverly Conrad; early analog videotape documentation of Conrad explaining and displaying his fried and pickled films...
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Full announcement at lightindustry.org/conradwritings
Possibly in Michigan, Cecelia Condit, 1983, digital projection, 12 mins
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The Fetishist, Jim Trainor, 1997, 16mm, 38 mins
Tuesday, September 24, 2019 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn

Light Industry probes the dark heart of the Midwest with two experiments in true crime: Cecelia Condit’s fractured fairy tale Possibly in Michigan and Jim Trainor’s animated profile The Fetishist.

A classic work of 1980s video art, Possibly in Michigan has recently gained a new life online, circulating first as a weird YouTube find that exploded on Reddit, then later via TikTok, becoming a viral sensation over the summer amongst the platform’s teenage users, who uploaded their own lip-syncs to its memorably bizarre soundtrack. The piece is based on a real-life account of how her friend once dated a man later discovered to be a cannibalistic serial killer (he murdered women and stored their body parts in his apartment). Condit renders this ghastly scenario with ironic relish, reframing it as a lo-fi-synth-musical-cum-revenge-fantasy in which two perfume-shopping protagonists are stalked by the ominous presence of a masked figure before ultimately making a meal out of him.

Trainor’s The Fetishist, meanwhile, presents scenes from the life of William Heirens, dubbed the “Lipstick Killer” by Chicago newspapers in the 1940s for scrawling a message on the wall of a victim’s home. “For heaven’s sake,” it spelled out in a smear of cosmetics, “catch me before I kill more: I cannot help myself.” Heirens’s crimes were also the basis for Fritz Lang’s 1956 late-noir While the City Sleeps, but rather than spinning a thrilling yarn around the homicides, Trainor imagines Heirens’s private moments through a series of dreamlike vignettes...
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Full announcement at lightindustry.org/possibly.
J. Hoberman Presents:
A New Beginning (Reagan Presidential Campaign, 1984)
The Next Voice You Hear (William A. Wellman, 1950)
October 1 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn

As much a symptom as a movie, The Next Voice You Hear was a major influence on my “Found Illusions” trilogy (An Army of Phantoms, The Dream Life, and Make My Day). It is a study in terror, so terrified it doesn’t recognize itself.

The movie appeared during a moment of crisis for Hollywood and the nation. Both had recently lost significant monopolies—the movie studios compelled to divest themselves of their theater chains, the U.S. no longer the world’s sole nuclear power. Both were under siege—whether by television or communism—and both were under investigation for internal subversion.

The Next Voice You Hear, which I discovered on television, Christmas Day 1973, practices a unique form of direct address. Its premise is so simple as to be nearly elegant and so cosmic as to appear certifiably insane: For six consecutive nights, the Creator of the Universe commandeers the radio waves to address the American people. However, God’s audience is essentially reduced to a single family living in a modest home in suburban Los Angeles. Joe Smith (James Whitmore) is a mechanic in the Ajax Aircraft Plant; his pregnant wife Mary (Nancy Davis, later Reagan) is a gracious, super-nurturing mother to their ten-year-old son Johnny (Gary Gray, prepping to play opposite Lassie). Initially, the movie is an unfunny situation comedy, with Joe as at once compliant wage-slave and household tyrant. He bosses his family and chafes under authority (defined as “everybody telling you what to do”), resenting most particularly his acerbic foreman (former Group Theater member, soon to be blacklisted Art Smith) and the neighborhood cop who regularly chastises him for too recklessly backing his heap out of the driveway.

Actually, God enters history only by hearsay. Charles Schnee’s rigorously schematic script ensures that, on each of the six days God takes to the airwaves, the viewing audience will miss the divine performance... - JH

Full announcement: lightindustry.org/thenextvoiceyouhear.
J. Hoberman Presents:
A New Beginning (Reagan Presidential Campaign, 1984)
The Next Voice You Hear (William A. Wellman, 1950)
October 1 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn

As much a symptom as a movie, The Next Voice You Hear was a major influence on my “Found Illusions” trilogy (An Army of Phantoms, The Dream Life, and Make My Day). It is a study in terror, so terrified it doesn’t recognize itself.

The movie appeared during a moment of crisis for Hollywood and the nation. Both had recently lost significant monopolies—the movie studios compelled to divest themselves of their theater chains, the U.S. no longer the world’s sole nuclear power. Both were under siege—whether by television or communism—and both were under investigation for internal subversion.

The Next Voice You Hear, which I discovered on television, Christmas Day 1973, practices a unique form of direct address. Its premise is so simple as to be nearly elegant and so cosmic as to appear certifiably insane: For six consecutive nights, the Creator of the Universe commandeers the radio waves to address the American people. However, God’s audience is essentially reduced to a single family living in a modest home in suburban Los Angeles. Joe Smith (James Whitmore) is a mechanic in the Ajax Aircraft Plant; his pregnant wife Mary (Nancy Davis, later Reagan) is a gracious, super-nurturing mother to their ten-year-old son Johnny (Gary Gray, prepping to play opposite Lassie). Initially, the movie is an unfunny situation comedy, with Joe as at once compliant wage-slave and household tyrant. He bosses his family and chafes under authority (defined as “everybody telling you what to do”), resenting most particularly his acerbic foreman (former Group Theater member, soon to be blacklisted Art Smith) and the neighborhood cop who regularly chastises him for too recklessly backing his heap out of the driveway.

Actually, God enters history only by hearsay. Charles Schnee’s rigorously schematic script ensures that, on each of the six days God takes to the airwaves, the viewing audience will miss the divine performance... - JH

Full announcement: lightindustry.org/thenextvoiceyouhear.
A Recipe for Disaster, Carolyn Lazard, 2018, digital projection, 27 mins (looped)
Friday, October 11 to Sunday, October 13, 2019, from 10am-6pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn

In 1972, Boston’s PBS affiliate WGBH became the first television outlet in the world to include captions for deaf and hard of hearing audiences as part of its programming, doing so initially with Julia Childs’s popular cooking series The French Chef. Closed-captioning, which can be turned off and on, had yet to be invented, so Childs’s show was broadcast with its monologue in open captions, visible to anyone sighted who tuned in. For some, the event offered a new level of access to mass media, yet for others, it also signaled the barriers, theretofore unacknowledged, that many of their fellow viewers had faced.

For their video A Recipe for Disaster, Carolyn Lazard created a continuous loop made from one of the earliest captioned episodes of The French Chef—a half-hour lesson on how to prepare an omelet, presented in its entirety. Augmenting this source material, Lazard has included their own voice as audio captioning, providing verbal descriptions of on-screen actions for blind and low-vision audiences. They have further added a kind of manifesto, rendered in crawling, yellow, all-caps lettering, that is simultaneously read by a second voice. Like Child and her omelets, Lazard combines three simple ingredients—image, sound, text—yielding a work that is variously legible, or illegible, depending on who encounters it...
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Full announcement at lightindustry.org/lazard.

FREE

Accessibility Information
Our venue is on the ground floor and is wheelchair accessible. The bathroom has grab bars, room for a powerchair, and is non-gender-segregated. Please contact information@lightindustry.org for more information.
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[Image: Yellow text overlays an image of Julia Child cooking. It reads “Then no one gets any. Image and sound that cannot be disentangled. A suffusion. A cacophony. No legibility for some. Illegibility for all. A sensory failure. A redistribution of violence.” White caption reads, “So how’s that for last-minute supper party.”]
La Dialectique peut-elle casser des briques? (Can Dialectics Break Bricks?), René Viénet, 1972, digital projection, 82 mins
Tuesday, October 22, 2019 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn
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A Recipe for Disaster, Carolyn Lazard, 2018, digital projection, 27 mins (looped)
Friday, October 11 to Sunday, October 13, 2019, from 10am-6pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn

In 1972, Boston’s PBS affiliate WGBH became the first television outlet in the world to include captions for deaf and hard of hearing audiences as part of its programming, doing so initially with Julia Childs’s popular cooking series The French Chef. Closed-captioning, which can be turned off and on, had yet to be invented, so Childs’s show was broadcast with its monologue in open captions, visible to anyone sighted who tuned in. For some, the event offered a new level of access to mass media, yet for others, it also signaled the barriers, theretofore unacknowledged, that many of their fellow viewers had faced.

For their video A Recipe for Disaster, Carolyn Lazard created a continuous loop made from one of the earliest captioned episodes of The French Chef—a half-hour lesson on how to prepare an omelet, presented in its entirety. Augmenting this source material, Lazard has included their own voice as audio captioning, providing verbal descriptions of on-screen actions for blind and low-vision audiences. They have further added a kind of manifesto, rendered in crawling, yellow, all-caps lettering, that is simultaneously read by a second voice. Like Child and her omelets, Lazard combines three simple ingredients—image, sound, text—yielding a work that is variously legible, or illegible, depending on who encounters it...
.
Full announcement at lightindustry.org/lazard.

FREE

Accessibility Information
Our venue is on the ground floor and is wheelchair accessible. The bathroom has grab bars, room for a powerchair, and is non-gender-segregated. Please contact information@lightindustry.org for more information.
.
[Image: Yellow text overlays an image of Julia Child cooking. It reads “Then no one gets any. Image and sound that cannot be disentangled. A suffusion. A cacophony. No legibility for some. Illegibility for all. A sensory failure. A redistribution of violence.” White caption reads, “So how’s that for last-minute supper party.”]
La Dialectique peut-elle casser des briques? (Can Dialectics Break Bricks?), René Viénet, 1972, digital projection, 82 mins
Tuesday, October 22, 2019 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn
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La Dialectique peut-elle casser des briques? (Can Dialectics Break Bricks?), René Viénet, 1972, digital projection, 82 mins
Tuesday, October 22, 2019 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn
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Films from The New Woman’s Survival Catalog
Tuesday, October 29 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn
Presented with @primaryinfo

My Name Is Oona, Gunvor Nelson, 1969, 16mm, 10 mins
Joyce at 34, Joyce Chopra and Claudia Weill, 1972, digital projection, 28 mins
Home Movie, Jan Oxenberg, 1972, digital projection, 12 mins
The Woman’s Film, Women’s Caucus of San Francisco Newsreel, 1971, digital projection, 40 mins

Published in 1973, The New Woman’s Survival Catalog is a seminal survey of Second Wave feminist efforts, which, as the editors note in their introduction, represented an “active attempt to reshape culture through changing values and consciousness.” Assembled by Kirsten Grimstad and Susan Rennie in only five months, with a nod to Stewart Brand’s influential Whole Earth Catalog, The New Woman’s Survival Catalog maps a vast network of feminist alternative cultural activity in the 1970s. Grimstad and Rennie set out on a two-month road trip in the summer of 1973, meeting and interviewing all the featured organizations and individuals, gathering information and further references along the way to complete the publication. Covering everything from arts organizations to bookstores and independent presses, from health, parenting, and rape crisis centers to educational, legal, and financial resources, the book provides a revelatory view into feminist initiatives and activism nationwide during the Women’s Movement. Styled as a sales catalog, The New Woman’s Survival Catalog comprises listings and organizational descriptions, articles, and extensive illustrations, as well as a “Making the Book” section, detailing the publication’s production.

It also includes a substantial film section, which guides browsers through a variety of the era’s independent distributors and feminist cooperatives—New Day Films, Newsreel Films, Women Make Movies, Video Women, and many others. Tonight, occasioned by the volume’s facsimile reissue by Primary Information, Light Industry co-hosts a selection of the films highlighted and made accessible by The New Woman’s Survival Catalog.

Full announcement at lightindustry.org/survival.
Films from The New Woman’s Survival Catalog
Tuesday, October 29 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn
Presented with @primaryinfo

My Name Is Oona, Gunvor Nelson, 1969, 16mm, 10 mins
Joyce at 34, Joyce Chopra and Claudia Weill, 1972, digital projection, 28 mins
Home Movie, Jan Oxenberg, 1972, digital projection, 12 mins
The Woman’s Film, Women’s Caucus of San Francisco Newsreel, 1971, digital projection, 40 mins

Published in 1973, The New Woman’s Survival Catalog is a seminal survey of Second Wave feminist efforts, which, as the editors note in their introduction, represented an “active attempt to reshape culture through changing values and consciousness.” Assembled by Kirsten Grimstad and Susan Rennie in only five months, with a nod to Stewart Brand’s influential Whole Earth Catalog, The New Woman’s Survival Catalog maps a vast network of feminist alternative cultural activity in the 1970s. Grimstad and Rennie set out on a two-month road trip in the summer of 1973, meeting and interviewing all the featured organizations and individuals, gathering information and further references along the way to complete the publication. Covering everything from arts organizations to bookstores and independent presses, from health, parenting, and rape crisis centers to educational, legal, and financial resources, the book provides a revelatory view into feminist initiatives and activism nationwide during the Women’s Movement. Styled as a sales catalog, The New Woman’s Survival Catalog comprises listings and organizational descriptions, articles, and extensive illustrations, as well as a “Making the Book” section, detailing the publication’s production.

It also includes a substantial film section, which guides browsers through a variety of the era’s independent distributors and feminist cooperatives—New Day Films, Newsreel Films, Women Make Movies, Video Women, and many others. Tonight, occasioned by the volume’s facsimile reissue by Primary Information, Light Industry co-hosts a selection of the films highlighted and made accessible by The New Woman’s Survival Catalog.

Full announcement at lightindustry.org/survival.
Films from The New Woman’s Survival Catalog
Tuesday, October 29 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn
Presented with @primaryinfo

My Name Is Oona, Gunvor Nelson, 1969, 16mm, 10 mins
Joyce at 34, Joyce Chopra and Claudia Weill, 1972, digital projection, 28 mins
Home Movie, Jan Oxenberg, 1972, digital projection, 12 mins
The Woman’s Film, Women’s Caucus of San Francisco Newsreel, 1971, digital projection, 40 mins

Published in 1973, The New Woman’s Survival Catalog is a seminal survey of Second Wave feminist efforts, which, as the editors note in their introduction, represented an “active attempt to reshape culture through changing values and consciousness.” Assembled by Kirsten Grimstad and Susan Rennie in only five months, with a nod to Stewart Brand’s influential Whole Earth Catalog, The New Woman’s Survival Catalog maps a vast network of feminist alternative cultural activity in the 1970s. Grimstad and Rennie set out on a two-month road trip in the summer of 1973, meeting and interviewing all the featured organizations and individuals, gathering information and further references along the way to complete the publication. Covering everything from arts organizations to bookstores and independent presses, from health, parenting, and rape crisis centers to educational, legal, and financial resources, the book provides a revelatory view into feminist initiatives and activism nationwide during the Women’s Movement. Styled as a sales catalog, The New Woman’s Survival Catalog comprises listings and organizational descriptions, articles, and extensive illustrations, as well as a “Making the Book” section, detailing the publication’s production.

It also includes a substantial film section, which guides browsers through a variety of the era’s independent distributors and feminist cooperatives—New Day Films, Newsreel Films, Women Make Movies, Video Women, and many others. Tonight, occasioned by the volume’s facsimile reissue by Primary Information, Light Industry co-hosts a selection of the films highlighted and made accessible by The New Woman’s Survival Catalog.

Full announcement at lightindustry.org/survival
Everything You Always Wanted to Know about Film Projection (But Were Afraid to Ask)
Tuesday, November 5, 2019 at 7pm
Light Industry, 155 Freeman Street, Brooklyn

This evening at Light Industry, following a presentation of Morgan Fisher’s Projection Instructions (1976), Spencer Christiano will provide an overview of the work that goes into film projection, a practice which is essential to the exhibition of motion pictures yet largely invisible. His talk coincides with the release of The Art of Film Projection: A Beginner’s Guide, a handsome volume published by the @eastmanmuseum in Rochester, where Christiano serves as Chief Projectionist. The book surveys the role’s myriad dimensions, including chapters on the film print (perforations, projection speed, aspect ratio, reel length), the projector (the projector mechanism, the picture head, the sound reader, the projector’s motor), screening environments (the booth, the screen, speakers), film inspection (the rewind bench, splices, shrinkage), pre-show preparations (threading the projector, mounting the reels, framing), final touches (gate tension, focus, masking), and of course the show itself, as well as information on the maintenance of the apparatus. There’s even a section dedicated to screening that most beautiful, rare, and—because of its extreme flammability—dangerous of film stocks: nitrate.

Beyond detailing the technical aspects of projection, the guide also advances an argument for the projectionist’s curatorial function. The care which should be put into the task is one of the most vital stages of film preservation; exhibited under the proper conditions, a print can survive unblemished after decades of screenings. Since the production of new prints is becoming more difficult with each passing year due to rising lab costs, the discontinuation of film stocks, and the challenges of obtaining quality negatives, the future of seeing films in their original format depends, in no small part, on the person who changes the reels, the star of our program.

Tickets - Pay-what-you-wish, available at door.

Please note: seating is limited. First-come, first-served. Box office opens at 6:30pm.